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Gallery: Line chart + Comparative chart

3 unique examples
Showing visual types:Comparative chart Icon for removing this tag Icon for how to create this kind of visualisationLine chart Icon for removing this tag Icon for this tag's benefits and pitfalls

Benefits & pitfalls

Benefits & pitfalls: line chart

  • Line-charts imply that data is continuously changing. If your data is discrete you might consider a bar-chart instead.

How to create your own

Create your own: comparative chart

  • Comparative charts are used to compare things such as performance, ranks, changes or characteristics. Basic comparative charts can be created in standard applications such as Excel using line graphs.

Effect plot

Screenshot for 'Effect plot'
Effect plots work by identifying high-order terms in a generalised linear model, a statistical technique. Once these terms are identified fitted values are derived and plotted for the relevant groups.
Unrated

Interactive time series

Screenshot for 'Interactive time series'
This visualisation offers some specialised information about a couple of economic indicators: cumulative percentage of change of some currencies against the dollar and the annualized percentage of change in exports. The information is displayed for six developing economies as a way to show the relationship between monetary policy (adopting floating currencies) and the change in the exports. It gives detailed information for each country in order to convey its message to a relatively specialized audience.
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Profile diagram

Screenshot for 'Profile diagram'
Visualisation used to show the relative position of research objects. In the example there are four brands rated for several dimensions in a survey.
Average rating: 10 (1 votes)