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Gallery: Pie chart + Bubble chart

4 unique examples
Showing visual types:Bubble chart Icon for removing this tag Icon for this tag's benefits and pitfalls Icon for how to create this kind of visualisationPie chart Icon for removing this tag Icon for this tag's benefits and pitfalls Icon for how to create this kind of visualisation

Benefits & pitfalls

Benefits & pitfalls: bubble chart

  • Using area or volume to represent data can distort data values, and exaggerate differences between values. For example, if the radius of the circle is used to represent data values, the area of the circle will quadruple if the data values double. There is also an issue of 'perceptual scaling' - the tendency of people to underestimate areas.

Benefits & pitfalls: pie chart

  • Pie charts are often criticised. Comparing the size of pie segments can be difficult, and many visualisation experts suggest that bar-charts should be used instead.

How to create your own

Create your own: bubble chart

  • Bubble charts can be created in a range of standard data applications such as Excel.

Create your own: pie chart

  • Pie charts can be created in a range of standard data applications such as Excel.

Bubble chart

Screenshot for 'Bubble chart'
County level 2008 US presidential election returns.
Average rating: 5.5 (18 votes)

Compound bubble and pie chart

Screenshot for 'Compound bubble and pie chart'
UK consumer spending broken down into categories (bubble size) and, within that, durability (pie chart).
Average rating: 7 (5 votes)

Matrix chart

Screenshot for 'Matrix chart'
The matrix chart divides the screen into a grid. Rows represent the values in one text column (e.g., political candidate) and columns represent another text column (e.g., states of the US). Each cell then shows a circle or bar that represents the value for its row/column combination (e.g., contribution to Hillary Clinton from New York).
Average rating: 5 (1 votes)

Population projection

Screenshot for 'Population projection'
This is a very rich infographic that combines several visualisation types: bubble chart, population pyramid, comparative line charts, a map, pie charts and it is additionally fully annotated. The picture itself is crossed by a line (without reference axis) that communicates the main message of the infographic: the rapid population growth experienced by the UK in recent decades. The supplementary charts display information about population proportions, population densities, age and gender structure, comparison between migration related and “natural” population change, fertility rates during the last 35 years and lastly population changes by government region during 2007-08. The display is very rich and is successful at grabbing’s the reader’s attention by offering an appealing combination of related data.
Average rating: 6 (3 votes)