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Gallery: High + Comparative chart

6 unique examples
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Showing visual types:Comparative chart Icon for removing this tag Icon for how to create this kind of visualisation

How to create your own

Create your own: comparative chart

  • Comparative charts are used to compare things such as performance, ranks, changes or characteristics. Basic comparative charts can be created in standard applications such as Excel using line graphs.

Circular connection graph

Screenshot for 'Circular connection graph'
Academic citations between journals (inner circle) and fields (outer journal)
Average rating: 5.1 (17 votes)
Visual types:

comparative chart

Cross-Reference visualisation

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Textual cross references found in the Bible.
Average rating: 6.8 (5 votes)
Visual types:

comparative chart

Double conditioning-plot

Screenshot for 'Double conditioning-plot'
A conditioning plot with splines added. It allows the visualisation of a variable distribution conditional on the values of the relevant groups of interest.
Unrated

Effect plot

Screenshot for 'Effect plot'
Effect plots work by identifying high-order terms in a generalised linear model, a statistical technique. Once these terms are identified fitted values are derived and plotted for the relevant groups.
Unrated

Parallel Sets (ParSets)

Screenshot for 'Parallel Sets (ParSets)'
Parallel Sets is a technique for visualizing categorical data. It helps you get away from representing individual data points, and instead show sets and subsets of items with certain combinations of criteria.<br />This example illustrates the people on board the Titanic. In a way, ParSets is a mix between parallel coordinates and treemaps/mosaic plots.
Average rating: 3.8 (10 votes)

Ternary plot

Screenshot for 'Ternary plot'
A type of scatterplot, this visualisation allows the representation of three variables. In the example, the plot presents the proportions of employment in the primary, secondary and tertiary sectors for 12 European countries in 1978, 1986 and 1997.
Average rating: 5 (2 votes)